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Conditions

Haemophilia

Alex, Haemophiliac

Above: Alex is a pro cyclist who has lived with haemophilia for his whole life.

Haemophilia was once known as ‘the royal disease’. Are corgis and a silly wave mandatory in order to contract haemophilia?

No. No they’re not. The origin of this nickname may lie in Queen Victoria passing haemophilia to her son Leopold, whose daughter Alice went on to have two haemophiliac sons and, further down the line, the illness infiltrated the Russian, German and Spanish royal families.

Haemophilia is essentially a hereditary blood clotting disorder whereby a cut to the skin will take longer than usual to stop bleeding. The condition can also lead to internal bleeding with no external cause and can be particularly serious if bleeding occurs in the brain, which is potentially fatal. Despite its reputation as hereditary, 1 in 3 cases occur in people with no family history of the disorder. Around 6,000 people in the UK suffer with haemophilia but it is estimated that mild cases remain undiagnosed in as many as 1 in 100 people. The illness overwhelmingly affects men, although women are commonly carriers and pass it on to their children entirely unawares.

Unfortunately there is no cure, and no way of permanently maintaining the missing blood clotting factor in haemophilia sufferers. The most common treatment is known as replacement therapy and consists of occasional injections of concentrates of artificially produced blood clotting factors. This treatment can often be self-administered and many haemophilia sufferers will keep a healthy supply of blood clotting factor in their fridge. In severe cases a method called prophylaxis may be used. This treatment attempts to prevent bleeding alogether, and in this case injections will have to be administered several times each week.

What the Men in White Coats Say

Comments and Questions

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I am an 18 year old girl who has type 1 von willebrands disease and was wondering should I take transexamic acid before having sex for the first time, would it limit possible bleeding? Any other advice appreciated.





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hi i am 13 year old girl and when i ever i cut myself or get cut it takes ages to bleed is this normal???





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Hi I am 16 years old and only 5 ft 5 and i have no facial hair yet and also my penis isn't getting bigger. I am getting quite worried about it is their anything you can suggest or anything i could take to solve my problem.





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Hi I am 19 years old and i am only around 5 ft 5 and have no facial hair and getting a bit anxious and worried. is there anything i could do or take to solve this problem





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No it's fine, you just haven't hit puberty as hard as some other people have yet, I would say that's okay for you because shaving can be a real nuisance, but if you really are worried about it go see a doctor just in case for they can tell you more than me if this is serious but remember it might not be serious and I know if it is puberty dont feel bad or anything it's just maybe those hormones haven't hit your face yet.


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Content supplied by NHS Choices

Haemophilia is a genetic (inherited) condition that affects the blood’s ability to clot. Read More »

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