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  • Dyspraxia

    Dyspraxia

    Dyspraxia is also known as developmental co-ordination disorder, and is the partial loss of the ability to co-ordinate and perform movements and gestures. Read more →

    I think you should definitely speak to your doctor about this. You should assume the same tone of urgency and concern as you have expressed in your writing above, but even if she does dismiss for it any reason, this is not a cause to be embarrassed. That's what GPs are for. And although I'm not anywhere near a qualified practitioner myself, your clumsiness could be linked to something more serious, but you won't know unless you ask. And in this case, I suggested you ignore any feelings of embarrassment amd consult your GP. Get her to run some test. If she doesn't insist, get a second opinion. Keep getting second opinions until you recognise an overwhelming consensus. I have a similar problem (clumsiness, short-term forgetfulness despite excellent academic record) and despite contacting my GP in more than one occasion over the smallest things, I eventually discovered that they were a result of depression despite my doctor dismissing it as stress all the time. Speak to your doctor: after all, getting a diagnosis is more important than the temporarily avoiding minor embarrassment. I wish you all the best and hope that you get an answer for your symptoms. :) Take care!

    I think a problem , is that there is too much focus especially in the past on little pre-school children and their parents. There are a large number of people who not know they have dyspraxia or dyspraxia traits. Support for adults is very weak or non - existant. Dyspraxia is far more than clumsiness. I prefer DANDA. The Dyspraxia USA is more and dynamic and eye-catching.

    I have been diagnosed with dyspraxia for a long time but never known how to deal with it. THe clumsiness doesnt effect to much except the bruises i get from walking into things however it has effected how i talk and get my point across. i often misinterpret things and its effected my relationship and work.Presentations are a nightmare and it often sounds like i'm unintellegent and dont know what i'm talking about. it's really knocked my confidence. what can i do ??

    I totally agree with you on this one, i am an adult with dyspraxia, but it wasnt diagnosed in my childhood, so that gave me problems. people need to realise that yes dyspraxia does cause problems with movement, but other difficulties need to addresse to, such as social skills and work. this reason for this is because if you the messages don't get from your brain to your body properly (clumsiness) then that is certain to have an impact in other areas.

    I think a support group would be highly beneficial! I have never spoken to anyone else with the disorder at great length or another female! There is a dyspraxic network on facebook which gives tips etc and there is even a dyspraxic wine bottle opener for sale on there! (Might be handy if you are as poor at opening bottles as I am). I am glad people are starting to become more aware of the disorder rather than saying its just an excuse for clumsiness/laziness. Out of interest which uni are you at?





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    My daughter was diagnosed with dyspraxia when she was 6. I realised that she couldn't hold a pencil properly and when she did it would always break. She struggles with reading and uses a colour rule line. Her writing is slow and sometimes unreadable. She needs extra time to finish work and often gets frustrated because of her slowness and clumsiness. You learn not to fill her glass too much because you know it'l get spilt. She has just turned 11 and has just learnt to ride her bike which was so much hard work but worth the reward. I am glad that you have talked about dyspraxia because alot of people have never heard of it. I find it a pity that there is no local centre here in Cornwall.





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    Hi, My daughter is now 21 yrs old and despite many times trying to get help via our various doctors and a diagnosis we have not managed and struggled by. It's extremely upsetting when your a mum and you know your child is suffering with many problems to do with learning,speech,reading,writing,daily activities,clumsiness,falls,lack of friends and all the other things many other children do and enjoy daily.I have often said my daughter had some form of Autism or Aspergers and only when we lived abroad was dyscalculia ever mentioned. I firmly believe my daughter suffers from Dyspraxia and some form of Autism/Aspergers. To this day still trying to get help and a diagnosis 30/012015. written by a very concerned mum.

    Hi I'm 31 (female) and today decided to goggle 'clumsy' as I've recently met some new colleges and have been made aware of how many times I've spilled my coffee all over my desk in a week. 3 times. Quite embarrassing. The older I get peoples laughing at my clumsiness has turned to confused looks of 'seriously what's wrong with her?' I've had a good job for almost 3 years but I forget simple instructions and keep a notepad with me at all times. I've always been forgetful. Terrible at any other subject apart from English. I constantly bump my head, cut myself, and I walk into walls all of the time. If I'm walking beside someone I'll say 'sorry' at least 5 times for bumping into them. I just can't help it. When I was younger I laughed it off but the scars on my hands, bruises on my thighs and torso (grazing objects such as tables and door handles etc) and constant spilling drinks has been the most embarrassing. Losing things and notorious lateness is also a serious problem. I do not feel comfortable bringing it to my GPs attention as I'm sure he'll dismiss my concerns. Can anyone tell me if I'm being silly or if I have a genuine complaint. Thanks in advance.





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    I think you should definitely speak to your doctor about this. You should assume the same tone of urgency and concern as you have expressed in your writing above, but even if she does dismiss for it any reason, this is not a cause to be embarrassed. That's what GPs are for. And although I'm not anywhere near a qualified practitioner myself, your clumsiness could be linked to something more serious, but you won't know unless you ask. And in this case, I suggested you ignore any feelings of embarrassment amd consult your GP. Get her to run some test. If she doesn't insist, get a second opinion. Keep getting second opinions until you recognise an overwhelming consensus. I have a similar problem (clumsiness, short-term forgetfulness despite excellent academic record) and despite contacting my GP in more than one occasion over the smallest things, I eventually discovered that they were a result of depression despite my doctor dismissing it as stress all the time. Speak to your doctor: after all, getting a diagnosis is more important than the temporarily avoiding minor embarrassment. I wish you all the best and hope that you get an answer for your symptoms. :) Take care!

    I'm 27 and was referred due to my clumsiness and inability to concentrate/follow instructions when I was 5yrs old by my teacher who had taught kids like me before. I' am grateful to this day to that teacher, as I'm sure without the referral I would have not been able to get the support with my education that I received. At times it was hard at school as wasn’t popular and did get bullied due to how i was, this wasn't helped by the fact that I had a teaching assistant in some of my classes to help with note taking and practical work where I needed more support. Due to this my social skills were never the best, usually stayed in at lunch and read my books. However when I left school and went on to college and university things did improve. I'm now a qualified nurse working in Mental Health and find the job very rewarding. Will admit to having some issues with the job but I've just found that repeating the tasks makes me more confident in doing them. I’m still clumsy as anything, and I’m pretty sure I haven’t gone a week of my life without having a bruise somewhere on my body. At work people do notice it, and I have explained to them why it happens, and for the most part everyone have accepted this. There are still some jokes about it at times, but these are not malicious at all and I will usually make them at times myself.





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    Please don’t swear or be rude in your comments, as they will not be added to the site. Please do not use your full name when posting comments. If in doubt, refer to the community guidelines

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    There is a excellent an inexpensive book for employers of those with dyspraxia. It is available on the dyspraxia foundation website

    I am a 30 year old woman who has been suffering from balance problems since the summer of 1998. Like many of you, I was first diagnosed as having Labyrinthitis. I'd also recently suffered concussion. I've had an MRI scan, a CT scan, grommets fitted in my ears and numerous eye tests. I've been investigated for Epilepsy, Menieres Disease, Carbon Monoxide Poisoning and ME. When it started I was doing my A Levels. At this time I also struggled with chronic fatigue, concentration issues, forgetfulness and clumsiness. I now suffer with severe panic attacks as a result of the last 15 years of my life. I'm on Propranalol, Fluoxetine and Avomine. (I was on other anti-sickness drugs, but am currently pregnant, and Avomine is a safer anti-emetic in prgenancy.) I never drink, I'm never a passenger in a car, I can't go in lifts and I can't go to the cinema. I suffer with migraines and migraines are in the family. I'll be trotting down to the doctors with the information on this episode on Monday to see if there is something more they might be able to do for me. Being a mother, I have noticed just how crippled I am by this illness - I cannot even spin round with my daughter or play ring o' ring o' roses like all the other mums do at baby groups. I am so relieved to find I am not alone. Like you, I was beginning to wonder if I was a drama queen, or a hyperchondriac! I cannot work, and feel it is such a waste, as I am a hard worker by nature and an intelligent person who, I feel, could have had a good career. Thank you so much for highlighting this problem!





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    Please don’t swear or be rude in your comments, as they will not be added to the site. Please do not use your full name when posting comments. If in doubt, refer to the community guidelines

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